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Tag: Safari

Another China controversy for Apple » Safari on iPhone shares IP addresses with a Chinese tech giant (UPDATED)

Alan Martin, via The Inquirer »

It’s emerged that by default, Safari shares some user IP addresses with Chinese conglomerate Tencent. To be entirely fair to Apple, it’s done as part of the Fraudulent Website Warning setting which protects against phishing scams, in the same way it does with Google Safe Browsing. But that might not be of much comfort to Chinese citizens. Tencent is, after all, a company that’s so buddy-buddy with the ruling Communist party that it literally made a game where you applaud a Xi Jinping speech.

Has Apple been transparent about this? Well, it depends on your definition of transparent. If you’re the kind of person that digs deep into iPhone settings and then feels obliged to click the “About Safari & Privacy” link then you will see the following line in the text: “Before visiting a website, Safari may send information calculated from the website address to Google Safe Browsing and Tencent Safe Browsing to check if the website is fraudulent. These safe browsing providers may also log your IP address.”

Read more at The Inquirer »

More via Twitter » Matthew Green

More » Matthew Green’s blog, 9to5Mac, SlashGear, The Hacker News, MacRumors, Engadget,

Apple’s response » We’re not handing over Safari URLs to Tencent – just people’s IP addresses

What sets iPadOS apart from iOS

TidBits has a good explanation, as is usual for them.

In addition to iOS 13 features like improved text editing, Sign in with Apple, enhanced Maps, and redesigned photo editing, iPadOS improves the multitasking system, beefs up Safari to support complex Web apps, adapts the Home screen for the larger iPad screens, improves markup features, and adds a new one-handed floating keyboard.

Head over to the TidBits article for a full explanation »

More from ComputerWorld

Apple neutered ad blockers in Safari, but users didn’t say a thing

Meanwhile many developers and users have been blasting Google for a similar plan in Chrome.

Catalin Cimpanu at ZDNet writes »

Over the course of the last year and a half, Apple has effectively neutered ad blockers in Safari, something that Google has been heavily criticized all this year.

But unlike Google, Apple never received any flak, and came out of the whole process with a reputation of caring about users’ privacy, rather than attempting to “neuter ad blockers.” The reasons may be Apple’s smaller userbase, the fact that changes rolled out across years instead of months, and the fact that Apple doesn’t rely on

and »

Apple realized it didn’t need web developers creating extensions for Safari directly, as they could simply leverage the apps in its App Store to provide Safari users with extra features.

and »

With the release of iOS 13, Apple ditched the old Safari Extensions Gallery for good, and officially announced it was deprecating legacy extensions. Currently, Safari users can’t install any legacy extension at all, regardless if it’s hosted on the Safari Extensions Gallery or not, or if they’re using iOS or macOS.

» Read more at ZDNet…

Apple iPhone Safari Hack that has existed for a couple of years is revealed » Updated Sept 8

Aug 30

Video from SkyNews… The iPhone has been hacked!

Sept 8

This upends pretty much everything we know about iPhone hacking. We believed that it was hard,” respected security expert Bruce Schneier writes on his blog. “We believed that if an exploit was used too frequently, it would be quickly discovered and patched. None of that is true here. This operation used fourteen zero-days exploits. It used them indiscriminately. And it remained undetected for two years.” While I am unlikely to switch to Android, my trust in the privacy and security capability of their devices has eroded.

» If we can’t trust Apple, who can we trust? » Om

More at Michael Tsai, BuzzFeed, John Gruber, TechCrunch, MacRumors, The Verge, Zeynep Tufekci

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