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Tag: Breach of Trust

Twitter claims it ‘unintentionally’ used the phone number you provided for account security purposes to target ads to you

Oops!

Ina Fried, writing for Axion »

Twitter disclosed Tuesday that it “unintentionally” used some email addresses and phone numbers for advertising even though the information was provided for account security.

Why it matters: It’s the latest example of a tech company misusing user data.

Facebook was recently fined $5 billion for a similar breach of trust!

More » TechCrunch, Thurrott, Ars Technica, CNET, The Verge, The Hacker News, ZDNet, Reuters, Bloomberg, Washington Post, The Mac Observer, The Mercury News, Android Central, Forbes

On Twitter » Paul Thurrott, Donie O’Sullivan, Drew Harwell

Google tracks users even when they turn off location tracking

An Associated Press report has revealed that several Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even after users set a privacy setting that is meant to stop Google from doing so.

Computer-science researchers at Princeton confirmed AP’s findings.

Associated Press:

Storing location data in violation of a user’s preferences is wrong, said Jonathan Mayer, a Princeton computer scientist and former chief technologist for the Federal Communications Commission’s enforcement bureau. A researcher from Mayer’s lab confirmed the AP’s findings on multiple Android devices; the AP conducted its own tests on several iPhones that found the same behavior.

“If you’re going to allow users to turn off something called ‘Location History,’ then all the places where you maintain location history should be turned off,” Mayer said. “That seems like a pretty straightforward position to have.”

Google says it is being perfectly clear.

“There are a number of different ways that Google may use location to improve people’s experience, including: Location History, Web and App Activity, and through device-level Location Services,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement to the AP. “We provide clear descriptions of these tools, and robust controls so people can turn them on or off, and delete their histories at any time.”

So far this year, US telecom companies have successfully stopped 70 state bills that would have prevented them from selling your personal data

Motherboard:

Rewind back to March 2017: Congress voted to overturn a yet-to-take-effect Obama-era FCC regulation requiring ISPs to get permission from customers before collecting their data and selling it to advertisers. It was a victory for corporate giants like Comcast and Verizon, who nevertheless assured everyone that they had no intention of selling their customers’ internet histories.

In the wake of that repeal, about half of the country’s states chose not to take the ISPs at their word, and began crafting their own legislation to restore the FCC’s rules within their borders. Washington, DC is the latest example, and the National Conference of State Legislatures shows close to 70 similar bills on state dockets this year. So far, not a single one has passed.

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