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Category: Social Media (Page 1 of 3)

Australia sues Facebook for breaching the privacy of over 300K Australians in the Cambridge Analytica scandal

Facebook could face millions of dollars in fines over allegedly breaching the privacy of over 300,000 Australian citizens caught up in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Josh Taylor, The Guardian »

The Australian information commissioner Angelene Falk has alleged Facebook committed serious and repeated interferences with privacy in contravention of Australian privacy law because data collected by Facebook was passed onto the This is Your Digital Life app by Cambridge Analytica for political profiling, which was not what it was collected for.

Data included people’s names, dates of birth, email addresses, city location, friends list, page likes and Facebook messages for those who had granted the app access to the messages.
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“We consider the design of the Facebook platform meant that users were unable to exercise reasonable choice and control about how their personal information was disclosed,” Falk said.

“Facebook’s default settings facilitated the disclosure of personal information, including sensitive information, at the expense of privacy.”

More » Office of the Australian Information Commissioner, Reuters, News.com.au, Seeking Alpha

What can you use instead of Google and Facebook? [Updated]

In recent months I too have been moving away from Google. I ditched evil Facebook a couple of years ago and haven’t looked back. But I had been holding out for Google to follow through on their promises. They haven’t and it now feels like the Antarctic will melt before Google will change their business practices.

So, searches are now with DuckDuckGo, Ecosia, and StartPage. And recently, I’ve been switching from Gmail to ProntoMail. I no longer use Chrome, except on rare occasions when I need to access Google services. WhatsApp is an extension of Facebook, and so I’ve never used it. I use the much safer Signal and Telegram instead.

Tom Jackson, BBC »

If Google knows everything you have ever searched for, it has a detailed catalogue of your interests, hopes and fears. Facebook knows who your friends are, what you like and what you talk about online.

Online data scandals have raised concerns about the power that information brings. Facebook is facing a fine of $5bn for its part in the notorious misuse of data by political consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

Concern is growing. A survey by the Washington-based digital agency Rad Campaign and analytics firm Lincoln Park Strategies last year, for example, found three out of five responders in the US distrust social media when it comes to protecting their privacy.

I think as more and more people recognize that Facebook, Google, and others are simply using them, they too will look for alternatives.

UPDATE » Here’s a similar take the subject from TechAltar »

Facebook promises to ban videos that are either heavily edited or deep fakes as it tightens policies around misleading media

Facebook has a major problem with credibility. They often state one thing and do another. Facebook’s statements and policies carry little weight.  I’m happy to wait to see what they actually do.

From Facebook » 

We are strengthening our policy toward misleading manipulated videos that have been identified as deepfakes. Going forward, we will remove misleading manipulated media if it meets the following criteria:

  • It has been edited or synthesized – beyond adjustments for clarity or quality – in ways that aren’t apparent to an average person and would likely mislead someone into thinking that a subject of the video said words that they did not actually say. And:
  • It is the product of artificial intelligence or machine learning that merges, replaces or superimposes content onto a video, making it appear to be authentic.
    This policy does not extend to content that is parody or satire, or video that has been edited solely to omit or change the order of words.

Twitter announced it is moving all accounts of users outside of the U.S. and the EU from Dublin, Ireland to the San Francisco where it will be subject to U.S. and California privacy and surveillance laws

Twitter also launched the Twitter Privacy Center in an effort to be more transparent, to offer »

more clarity around what we’re doing to protect the information people share with us.

Elizabeth Culliford, writing for Reuters »

The changes, which will take effect on Jan. 1, 2020, will comply with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).

The California law requires large businesses to give consumers more transparency and control over their personal information, such as allowing them to request that their data be deleted and to opt out of having their data sold to third parties.

[…]

Twitter also announced on Monday that it is moving the accounts of users outside of the United States and European Union which were previously contracted by Twitter International Company in Dublin, Ireland, to the San Francisco-based Twitter Inc.

The company said this move would allow it the flexibility to test different settings and controls with these users, such as additional opt-in or opt-out privacy preferences, that would likely be restricted by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), Europe’s landmark digital privacy law.

Read the whole article on Reuters »

More » Twitter’s Blog Post, Security Week, TechCrunch, CNet, Engadget, Fast Company

Canadian courts powerless to order Facebook to hand over private messages

Result » Canadian federal legislators need to enact legislation that will be enforceable within Canadian jurisdiction.

If Facebook, and others, want to operate within Canadian borders, they must be expected to work within Canadian society’s rules, regulations, and customs.

Kate Dubinski, writing in CBC News »

The case involved Facebook messages that police in London, Ont., wanted to access in order to proceed with a homicide investigation and trial.

Because Facebook is an American company, the usual legal process involves Canadian authorities applying for evidence, in this case from the Facebook Messenger app, through a mutual legal assistance treaty (MLAT). The treaty has been used for decades by police on both sides of the border to get access to physical evidence.

In this case, a judge issued a production order — essentially a legal order for Facebook to give up the information. Authorities thought that would be quicker than the treaty process, which takes about four months.

But when it became clear this fall Facebook would fight tooth and nail against having to comply with a Canadian judge’s order, the Crown applied through the MLAT for the messages and received them.

Read the whole article in CBC News »

[Updated] Twitter to remove inactive accounts in an effort to free up usernames

Updated » Twitter pauses plan to delete inactive accounts – Axios

These guys know where it’s @ » Jason Scott of the Internet Archive offers a process to keep a copy of the tweets of dead users.

Chris Merriman, writing for The Inquirer »

Electronic sulking forum Twitter has announced an unprecedented cull of dormant accounts, as it frees up some tasty Twitter handles that you wish you’d thought of first.

The cull will apply to all accounts that haven’t been accessed in over six months, as of 11 December 2019. Users that aren’t ready to give up access to @1direction4eva and @reggienbollie2win just need to do is log in to that account and the clock will stop.

[…]

It’s thought that the cull will destroy countless ‘bot’ accounts as well as unloved human-led ones, and it’ll be interesting to see if the drop in user numbers that will inevitably come, goes down well with investors, ever keen to find and increase Twitter’s bottom-line.

More » BBC, The Verge, International Business Times, CNet, SlashGear, TechCrunch

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