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Category: Whatnot (page 1 of 3)

Samsung is betting a lot on it’s new foldable Galaxy Z

Available from Friday, February 14. Will this be a Valentine’s Day for your sweetheart?

 

Plex launches a free, ad-supported streaming service — featuring movies, TV shows, news — worldwide

What makes this announcement unique, Plex has structured its deals with studios and other copyrights holders to stream content to, reportedly, over 200 countries.

More » 9to5Mac, MacRumors, Android Authority, The Verge, iPhone in Canada Blog, Mobile Syrup, TechSpot, SlashGear

This weekend only » Apple News+ offering three month free trial

Apple »

This weekend only, get a 3 month free trial of Apple News+ and enjoy full access to hundreds of magazines and leading newspapers.

A new community broadband network went live in Fort Collins, Colorado offers 1 Gbps for US$60 after years of battling Comcast

Karl Bode at TechDirt writes »

A new community broadband network went live in Fort Collins, Colorado recently offering locals there gigabit fiber speeds for $60 a month with no caps, restrictions, or hidden fees. The network launch comes years after telecom giants like Comcast worked tirelessly to crush the effort. Voters approved the effort as part of a November 2017 ballot initiative, despite the telecom industry spending nearly $1 million on misleading ads to try and derail the effort. A study (pdf) by the Institute for Local Reliance estimated that actual competition in the town was likely to cost Comcast between $5.4 million and $22.8 million each year.

Unlike private operations, the Fort Collins Connexion network pledges to adhere to net neutrality. The folks behind the network told Ars Technica the goal is to offer faster broadband to the lion’s share of the city within the next few years:

“The initial number of homes we’re targeting this week is 20-30. We will notify new homes weekly, slowly ramping up in volume,” Connexion spokesperson Erin Shanley told Ars. While Connexion’s fiber lines currently pass just a small percentage of the city’s homes and businesses, Shanley said the city’s plan is to build out to the city limits within two or three years.

“Ideally we will capture more than 50% of the market share, similar to Longmont,” another Colorado city that built its own network, Shanley said. Beta testers at seven homes are already using the Fort Collins service, and the plan is to start notifying potential customers about service availability today.

Kelsey Bressler was frustrated by unsolicited dick pics so she decided to do something about it. She make a filter to remove those unfortunate images from her Twitter account. Why don’t or won’t social media companies do this?

Why anyone, and by anyone I mean any man, would put a photo of their junk online is beyond my comprehension.

» Read about it at Slate…

18% of British people are not using the internet

Other survey findings:

  • 10% do not use the net because of privacy worries
  • 40% of those earning less than £12,500 do not go online
  • 70% of all respondents “uncomfortable” with targeted advertising and data tracking
  • 12% have been hit by computer viruses
  • 11% got abusive emails

» Read more at the BBC…

Finally, Apple offers genuine iPhone parts and tools to independent repair shops

This is a surprising and welcome change. Although, lets not forget this came after a lot of media and public pressure over a long period.

The company has announced the Independent Repair Program, which will provide independent repair businesses, regardless of size, with the same genuine parts, tools, training, repair manuals, and diagnostics for iPhone repairs as it gives to Apple Authorized Service Providers. After piloting the program with 20 repair business in North America, Europe, and Asia, Apple is launching the program in the United States with plans to expand it to other countries.

There’s no cost for repair shops to join the Independent Repair Program, although the application information notes that applicants must be established businesses in a commercially zoned area, and all repairs using genuine iPhone parts must be performed by an Apple-certified technician.

Read More by Adam Engst at TidBits…

Video » This is how Google’s Chrome tracks you with cookies

From the Washington Post via YouTube »

Chrome has become like spyware for the company, allowing more tracker cookies than any other browser. The Post’s Geoffrey A. Fowler imagines how that might feel in real life, and gives advice for more privacy-conscious web browsing.

More » Washington Post (paywall)

The Toaster that Costs $270 and Makes Only One Slice at a Time

The obsession with the perfectly toasted slice of bread.

Reed Stevenson writing for Bloomberg:

Perfectly made toast isn’t just an obsession in Japan. It’s a business opportunity.

Over the past few years, there’s been a quiet boom in the pursuit of expertly reheated bread, from high-end toasters and premium loaves, to cafes catering to connoisseurs seeking that satisfying crunch.

Joining the fray is the next best thing for sliced bread, a toaster designed for just one task: making a single piece of toast, flawlessly. Made by Mitsubishi Electric Corp., better known for its workaday refrigerators and rice cookers, the Bread Oven hit store shelves last month, retailing for about 29,000 to 30,000 yen ($270). While that might seem expensive, Japanese consumers are already used to paying top price for toasters; the popular Balmuda, which debuted a few years ago, sold for about $230.

Read More…

Switching to a flip phone

Pam Moore:

The objective of my most recent Toastmasters speech was to persuade my audience. I decided I’d try to persuade them to shut their phones off—for a day, for a night, or for an hour. I told them stories about my own digital sabbath and how I feel after 24 hours of being phoneless.

I described the feeling of just being wherever I was, enjoying things like a novel or a movie instead of battling the nagging urge to check my phone. I described the discomfort of being stuck in a crappy situation with no way of texting my husband and begging him to bail me out, only to be pleasantly surprised when he showed up and saved me of his own accord. I described the peace I found in starting my day without the distractions of everyone else’s agendas the second I looked at my email.

I described the clarity, the connection, and the gratitude I felt when my phone was off.

I cited research on the addictive nature of phones, including this staggering statistic: The average American checks their phone 150 times a day. That’s once every six waking minutes.

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